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Wrestler Mike Parrow steps out of the closet publicly

Photo credit:
Mike Parrow - Facebook

The humungous wrestler Mike Parrow who stands at 6’4” and weighs 300 pounds came out in and exclusive interview for Gay Star News.

“I’ve always known I’m gay,” he told the publication. “That was never a question in my mind.”

Parrow may look foreboding and intimidating now, but there was a time when he struggled with his sexuality even going so far as to consider taking his own life. 

"The only exposure I saw of any gay culture was extremely effeminate and that was what was on TV. I’m not like Jack on Will and Grace, so I’m not gay.

"Maybe it is a choice,’ Parrow told the publication. "So I tried to hide it. I played football and did manly stuff. It wasn’t because I was gay. Those were the things I gravitate to – competitive stuff."

The wrestler also tried to date women, He says when he was younger that was easier, but "I would find ways to end it. I’d be like, 'Listen, I just don’t think you’re pretty.' And I was kind of mean to some women. It’s wrong. And I wish sometimes I could have that back.":

As he realized and became more comfortable he found himself in Florida, but even then he had to get used to the LGBT community. 

"Gay men can be the meanest, cruelest people you’ve ever met in your life. I was 'fat,'  I was 'ugly,' I’m a 'closet case.' and at the time I was just looking to understand what’s going on.

I learned you can get very much masculine shamed in the gay community as of late, which is really weird, but it happens.

And so that put me further back in the closet than going forward. So I buried myself in wrestling and focused on my career. And I had some success, but that was always in the back of my mind."

Through years of self-loathing and shame-he even paid for conversion therapy which he now calls a "joke," Parrow listened to his psychiatrist's advice and shortly after met his now-fiance Morgan.  

Being a professional athlete and out in a sport that is mainly perceived as straight can have its drawbacks, but Parrow handles that as it arises

"You get a lot of different things said in locker rooms that you’d never say in real life,' he says. "People will throw slurs around left and right, so I just address it when I feel like it’s gone too far. Maybe it’s not towards me, but if it’s gone too far, I will address them. I’ll say, “Do you really think that’s necessary right now?”’

"I find, especially with a lot of wrestlers, they have a lot of questions. A lot of questions. I’m open and honest when people ask me questions. So, I’ve not necessarily had hatred towards me. More curiosity."

You can read the interview in its entirety by clicking HERE.