Jean Lowerison

Theater Review: "Cabaret"

Randy Harrison as the Master of Ceremonies in "Cabaret," stopping in San Diego on its national Broadway tour.

"Leave your troubles outside,” says the Emcee (Randy Harrison). “We have no troubles here.”

If only.

It’s 1929 in Berlin, a chaotic, decadent time when alcohol, drugs and sex may not have been free but were certainly easy to come by.

In the seedy Kit Kat Klub, you could watch girls dance or perhaps (for a price) get more familiar with them. 

Theater Review: "Love’s Labor’s Lost"

Amy Blackman as Maria, Pascale Armand as Rosaline, Kevin Cahoon as Boyet, Kristen Connolly as Princess of France, and Talley Beth Gale as Katherine in William Shakespeare's "Love's Labor's Lost."

Ah, what could be better on a warm summer night than romance and Shakespearean silliness?

Okay, it wasn’t that warm, but the Old Globe Shakespeare Festival offers a charming version of “Love’s Labor’s Lost” through Sept. 18 at the Lloyd Davies Festival Theatre.

Theater Review: "Titanic"

Steven Glaudinim Norman Large and Robert J Townsend in Titanic

The sinking of the “unsinkable” Titanic in 1912 is an event almost too big and awful to wrap your mind around, let alone to consider depicting it onstage in a musical.

Theater Review: “Oklahoma!”

Anything but plain, "Oklahoma!" sweeps through the New Village Arts Theatre

Cowboys and farmers, the surrey with the fringe on top and that wind that comes whipping down the plain?

Yep, it’s “Oklahoma!” back for another visit. This time it’s in Carlsbad, where it plays through Sept. 25, at New Village Arts.

Theater Review: “Airline Highway"

 Tomia Taylor, Dana Fares, Beverly Baker, Kevane La'Marr Coleman, Nicole Sollazzo & Natasha Partnoy.

“The House of the Rising Sun” sets the scene for Lisa D’Amour’s “Airline Highway,” presented in its West Coast premiere through Sept. 3, by ion theatre (but at the Tenth Avenue Arts Center rather than ion’s usual Hillcrest digs). 

Theater Review: "The Last Five Years"

Jason Robert Brown (composer of the musicals “Parade” and “The Bridges of Madison County”) wrote “The Last Five Years” in response to a broken relationship he experienced.

Who hasn’t had at least one relationship that seemed great and ended badly?

Jason Robert Brown (composer of the musicals “Parade” and “The Bridges of Madison County”) wrote “The Last Five Years” in response to a broken relationship he experienced.

“Five Years” is now in a fine but very short run through Aug. 21 at Hillcrest’s ion theatre, as part of its “Off the Radar” series.

Theater Review: "The Taming Of The Shrew"

Kym Pappas and Joel Castellaw

Let’s face it, the forced submission of Kate “the Cursed” to bounty-hunter husband Petruchio in Shakespeare’s “The Taming Of The Shrew” is enough to bring on hives in the modern woman, and even more so when she does that last bit about placing your foot beneath your husband’s hand as a sign of obedience.

Theater Review: "[manhandled]"

[manhandled]” was inspired by watching people and their relationships on display at airports.

Choreographer Michael Mizerany’s latest dance show “[manhandled]” was inspired by watching people and their relationships on display at airports. Shows you what a creative person can do with what I have always considered time wasted.

Four works are offered: the titular new work, a commissioned dance choreographed by Bradley R. Lundberg and encores of two previously shown works.

Theater Review: “Meteor Shower"

Greg Germann appears as Norm and Josh Stamberg as Gerald

Ah, those deadly after-dinner parties. Playwrights love ’em – especially Edward Albee, who penned the grandpa of them all, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?”

Theater Review: “Junk: The Golden Age Of Debt”

Zakiya Iman Markland, Linus Roache and Henry Stram

If the intricacies of junk bond trading leave you in “Huh?” mode like they do me, don’t look to Ayad Akhtar’s latest play to enlighten you very much. But you can’t miss the warning he’s sending.

La Jolla Playhouse presents the world premiere of “Junk: The Golden Age Of Debt” through Aug. 21 at the Mandell Weiss Theatre, directed by Doug Hughes.