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Michigan court sides with gym client who claims Planet Fitness didn't tell her trans women could use the locker room

Planet Fitness may be headed back to court after former client cites the club didn't tell her trans women could use the locker room too.
Photo credit:
Wikimedia Commons

The Michigan appeals court says Yvette Cormier can proceed with her case against Planet Fitness for canceling her membership after she publically protested trans women using the locker room. 

In 2015 Cormier made the news after her very public protest which ultimately resulted in the gym revoking her membership. She sued the company for $25,000 saying she suffered a violation of privacy, severe emotional distress, and damage to her reputation.

Planet Fitness said their decision to end customer ties with Cormier was because she exhibited  “inappropriate and disruptive” behavior and she didn't adhere to the "judgment-free zone" rule of the company. 

She didn't prevail in either the Michigan lower court or the state court at the time. But in April of this year, the Michigan Supreme Court said they would look at the case and on Monday determined that Planet Fitness was at fault and the appeals court was wrong to decline Cormier's claims under the Michigan Consumer Protection Act.

Cormier said she was promised by the health club that she would have access to a private women's locker room but they didn't disclose that trans women, or as the ruling put it, "men who self-identify as women,” would also be allowed to use it. 

“Plaintiff’s actions indicate that she strongly preferred a locker room and a restroom in which individuals who are assigned biologically male are not present,” the court ruled, “and it is thus reasonable to infer that defendants’ failure to inform plaintiff of the unwritten policy affected her decision to join the gym.”

This implies that the court agrees with Cormier's assessment that trans women are not women and that Planet Fitness is guilty of “failing to reveal a material fact” in an attempt to “mislead or deceive the consumer,”

The case will now make its way back to the lower court, but Cormier’s lawyer is hoping to claim victory without a trial, but in doing so that court would also have to agree that trans women are "men who self-identify as women,”