In The Obama Presidential Center Site, A Noose Has Been Found!

Obama Presidential Center Site

Law enforcement’s killing of young black men and boys damaged the Obama presidency and brought the aphorism “black lives matter” to the forefront. In the recently inaugurated National Museum of African American History and Culture, a noose was discovered in 2019.

It was left in the museum’s exhibit devoted to the subject of segregation and the apartheid system in the United States. And it is not shocking that America, with its long and awful history of apartheid, has experienced it once more! A noose was recently discovered at the Obama Presidential Center in Chicago, forcing construction suspension.

The project’s sponsors, a coalition of Black-owned construction firms called Lakeside Alliance, claimed to have reported the incident to authorities on Thursday. The noose is more than just a racist symbol, according to JB Pritzker, the governor of Illinois, who strongly denounced the incident on Twitter.

Developments In The Project Management

It is a chilling reminder of the misery and brutality that black Americans have endured for millennia, according to Mr. Pritzker. According to the company in charge, construction on the project has been suspended so that workers and staff can get anti-bias training.

In a statement, Lakeside Alliance emphasized that intolerance or hatred is not tolerated on the job site. The extrajudicial hangings, sometimes known as lynchings, that took place in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, primarily against black individuals, are associated with the looped rope.

Developments In The Project

Barack Obama and Michelle Obama were present at a groundbreaking ceremony last September, marking the start of construction on the Center in 2021. Opening in 2025, the $500 million (£424.3 million) Center is anticipated to draw about 750,000 visitors annually.

According to the Obama Foundation’s website, the Center offers a once-in-a-generation chance to create a top-notch museum and community meeting place on Chicago’s South Side that honors our country’s first African American President and First Lady. Most of the construction expenses were covered by private donations.

The Symbolism Of The Hangman’s Noose In American Apartheid

The lynchings in America were not when the noose was first used. For as long as there have been societies to hang them, men have been executed by hanging.

For example, in the biblical story of Esther, Haman hangs himself from the same gibbet he had built for the Jewish leader Mordecai. Until the late 18th century, Tyburn Square in London was a well-known location for public hangings; the first execution there is documented to have occurred in 1196.

The Huffington Post claims that the noose is being used more and more frequently around the country. For generations of African-Americans who are aware of its past, the lynching noose is an artifact that is insulting. According to an evil philosophy of human hierarchy, the noose symbolizes one group of people’s oppression over another, specific whites over blacks.

The NAACP estimates that at least 3,446 black persons were executed in the US between 1882 and 1968. More dramatically, black people were responsible for 72.7% of all documented lynchings, despite making up no more than 12% of the population at the time.

The extensive use of lynching, often known as the “Negro holocaust,” was a cultural policy carried out in America using a variety of tactics, including shooting, strangulation, stabbing, drowning, and, most significantly, hanging.

Few artists have done a better job of capturing the tragic nature of lynching in popular culture than jazz singer Billie Holiday. Her delivery of the song “Strange Fruit” in the 1940s stunned the country to its very core and ignited opposition to the barbaric practice.

The irony of America is that the nation appeared to turn against itself on racial issues under the first black president. Many of us believed that the Obama presidency would lead to racial advancements, but the opposite has happened.

Written By

Shone Palmer
Shone Palmer

I’ve been writing about LGBTQ issues for more than a decade as a journalist and content writer. I write about things that you care about. LGBTQ+ issues and intersectional topics, such as harmful stories about gender, sexuality, and other identities on the margins of society, I also write about mental health, social justice, and other things. I identify as queer, I’m asexual, I have HIV, and I just became a parent.

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