St. Edward’s Crown Is Being Modified For The New King Of England

St. Edward’s Crown Is Being Modified For The New King Of England

According to the latest reports from the United Kingdom, it is clear that an uncommon event is taking place within the walls of the mighty ‘Tower Of London.’

In an official press release statement given by the ‘Buckingham Palace’ of the UK, finally, after a pause of nearly sixty years, the Crown of St. Edward is being taken outside the walls of ‘The Tower of London’ to modify and re-shape it for his majesty the king of Great Britain, Charles-III.

The coronation event is quite shocking to many UK natives as nearly sixty years have passed since such an event occurred in the country.

The last time the St. Edward’s Crown was passed down to Queen Elizabeth II from her father, King George VI, was in 1953.

Reports also stated that the information regarding the route of transport and the arrival and departure timing of the precious Crown had been kept under very tight control. As a result, there is no information available currently to the public.

Although, it is expected that the Crown will be available for the public to see in the mighty ‘Tower of London’ before the coronation ceremony of the new king Charls-III, which will take place on the 6th of May next year.

What Are The Traditions Regarding St. Edward’s Crown?

As per the customs and centuries-old royal traditions of Great Britain, the new king will be presented with the royal Crown of St. Edwards during the solemn ceremony, which will take place at London’s Westminster Abbey.

St. Edward’s Crown Is Being Modified For The New King Of England

The event will unfold on the 6th of May in the year 2023, and from the day after, the new king will have to wear the Crown while conducting his service for the people.

Interestingly, king Charls-III will also receive the Crown precisely seventy years after his mother, the late Queen Elizabeth-II, did back in 1953 from her father.

The coronation ceremony will take place after nearly eight months have passed since the king acceded to the throne and the death of his mother and her majesty, Queen Elizabeth II.

It is also expected that the coronation ceremony will be followed strictly based on centuries-old traditions, thus having a core element regarding traditional services. Still, it is also going to have a touch of the new twenty-first century modern Britain.

But, despite having a very modern touch to the centuries-old traditions and ceremonies, the ruling monarch is still going to have a central role in the ceremony, as per statements from BBC.

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What Is The History Behind St. Edward’s Crown?

According to the royal archives and reports, the Crown of St. Edward was forged in the seventeenth century. Since then, it has been used by numerous British monarchies for nearly three hundred and fifty years.

Interestingly, the Crown of St. Edward’s was going to replace an even older crown made back in the eleventh century, originally designed for the coronation ceremony of the then-king of England, ‘Edward The Confessor.’

The new Crown of St. Edward was later designed from the melted part of the older eleventh-century Crown back in 1649. The new Crown was created by the then-royal goldsmith Robert Vyner, who finally prepared the latest design for the coronation of the then-king Charles II in 1661.

Even though the new Crown of St. Edward has some slight alterations regarding its design, both mares are considered to be the ‘Crown of St. Edward.’

The new Crown consists of four cross patties, four fleurs-de-lis, and two extended arches, which were supposedly present on the original Crown of St. Edward.

Interestingly, the total weight of the Crown is measured to be nearly five pounds, and it has a solid set of gold frames with a unique collection of precious gemstones.

Written By

Shone Palmer
Shone Palmer

I've been writing about LGBTQ issues for more than a decade as a journalist and content writer. I write about things that you care about. LGBTQ+ issues and intersectional topics, such as harmful stories about gender, sexuality, and other identities on the margins of society, I also write about mental health, social justice, and other things. I identify as queer, I'm asexual, I have HIV, and I just became a parent.

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