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Facebook tumbles into stricter NSFW language policies

Facebook clamps down on solicitation and sexual content, verbiage.
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As the social media slowly becomes safer for work, Facebook has added to its chastity by implementing stricter rules for platform users who want to express aspects of their sexuality.  

Facebook updated its "Community Standards" policy under the "sexual solicitation" subheading this past October, but only now are users seeing a crack-down according to PC Magazine

The policy includes a long list of unacceptable verbiage such as:

"Using sexual hints such as mentioning sexual roles, sex positions, fetish scenarios, sexual preference/sexual partner preference, state of arousal, act of sexual intercourse or activity (sexual penetration or self-pleasuring), commonly sexualized areas of the body such as the breasts, groin, or buttocks, state of hygiene of genitalia or buttocks."

That means if you identify yourself as a "top" or "bottom" or use terms such as "looking for a good time tonight" in a post, it may get you booked into "Facebook jail," or worse, under suspicion of solicitation. 

Facebook already has an anti-porn policy, but the new standards flesh out those guidelines even more to include erotic art and sexual propositions. 

These new updates paint a broad stroke in that if someone mentions they are gay, others may find that offensive or see it as "encouraging sexual encounters between adults" and therefore report them. 

"We also restrict sexually explicit language that may lead to solicitation because some audiences within our global community may be sensitive to this type of content and it may impede the ability for people to connect with their friends and the broader community."

Facebook will probably evaluate each report on a case-by-case basis. 

Sex workers and erotic artists will be monetarily affected by the latest ban, which follows on the heels of Tumblr's proclamation that sexually explicit content will no longer be hosted on its pages. 

Facebook says its regulations are all in an attempt to clarify what qualifies as solicitation. 

"This change was prompted, in large part, by conversations with our content reviewers, who told us that the sexual exploitation policy did not adequately distinguish between exploitation (e.g. 'My ex was a slut. Look at the photos she sent me.') and solicitation (e.g. 'Looking for swingers. Friday at 8 PM, [name of bar]. Wear pink.')," a spokesperson told PC Mag.

The new rules, Facebook says, were developed with third-party consultants that specialize in women's and children's online safety.

The company is hiring people for a new department who will oversee and judge posts based on the new guidance. They say they will remain transparent throughout the entire process. 

"We'll be putting out the minutes from our policy development meeting at which these changes are discussed and adopted, and we'll also publish updates to our Community Standards so that people can track changes over time," the spokesperson said.